Pride and Prejudice Quotes

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Pride and Prejudice Mr Darcy Quotes
Pride and Prejudice Quotes
Pride and Prejudice is a novel by Jane Austen, first published in 1813. The story follows the main character Elizabeth Bennet, as she deals with issues of manners, upbringing, morality, education, and marriage in early 19th century Britain.

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
Chapter 1

She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper.
Chapter 1

Mary wished to say something very sensible, but knew not how.
Chapter 2

To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.
Chapter 3

Affectation of candour is common enough—one meets with it everywhere. But to be candid without ostentation or design—to take the good of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad—belongs to you alone.
Chapter 4

I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.
Chapter 5

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.
Chapter 5

If a woman is partial to a man, and does not endeavour to conceal it, he must find it out.
Chapter 6

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.
Chapter 6

A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony, in a moment.
Chapter 6

But people themselves alter so much, that there is something new to be observed in them for ever.
Chapter 9

A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.
Chapter 10

"Nothing is more deceitful," said Darcy, "than the appearance of humility.
Chapter 10

Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.
Chapter 11

He spoke well; but there were feelings besides those of the heart to be detailed; and he was not more eloquent on the subject of tenderness than of pride. His sense of her inferiority—of its being a degradation—of the family obstacles which judgement had always opposed to inclination, were dwelt on with a warmth which seemed due to the consequence he was wounding, but was very unlikely to recommend his suit.
Chapter 11

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.
Chapter 11

In spite of her deeply-rooted dislike, she could not be insensible to the compliment of such a man's affection, and though her intentions did not vary for an instant, she was at first sorry for the pain he was to receive; till, roused to resentment by his subsequent language, she lost all compassion in anger.
Chapter 11

Towards him I have been kinder than towards myself.
Chapter 11

I have made no such pretension. I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding—certainly too little for the convenience of the world.
Chapter 11

For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?
Chapter 15

They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects.
Chapter 16

Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion.
Chapter 17

It is particularly incumbent on those who never change their opinion, to be secure of judging properly at first.
Chapter 18

That will do extremely well, child. You have delighted us long enough. Let the other young ladies have time to exhibit.
Chapter 18

Do not consider me now as an elegant female intending to plague you, but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart.
Chapter 19

An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do.
Chapter 20

Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.
Chapter 20

A girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then. It is something to think of. . .
Chapter 24

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it.
Chapter 24

You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity, nor endeavour to persuade yourself or me, that selfishness is prudence, and insensibility of danger security for happiness.
Chapter 24

We do not suffer by accident. It does not often happen that the interference of friends will persuade a young man of independent fortune to think no more of a girl whom he was violently in love with only a few days before.
Chapter 25

I never saw a more promising inclination; he was growing quite inattentive to other people, and wholly engrossed by her.
Chapter 25

What are men to rocks and mountains?
Chapter 27

There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.
Chapter 31


In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.
Chapter 34

From the very beginning—from the first moment, I may almost say—of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.
Chapter 34

You have said quite enough, madam. I perfectly comprehend your feelings, and have now only to be ashamed of what my own have been. Forgive me for having taken up so much of your time, and accept my best wishes for your health and happiness.
Chapter 34

You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.
Chapter 34

Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly..... till this moment I never knew myself.
Chapter 36

Angry people are not always wise.
Chapter 45

Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.
Chapter 47

He is a gentleman, and I am a gentleman's daughter. So far we are equal.
Chapter 56

I am excessively diverted.
Chapter 57

I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.
Chapter 60
 
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